Why Solar

Solar Saves Money. Pay as little as $0 upfront, immediately lower your monthly electricity bill, and protect yourself from annual electricity rate increases

Solar energy is an abundant natural resource. Each minute enough sunlight reaches the Earth’s surface to meet the world’s energy demand for an entire year.

You can use clean electricity from solar panels on your home to replace power produced by coal, oil, and nuclear power plants.

Solar energy producing systems increase your property’s value. Long-term studies published in the Appraisal Journal indicate that home improvements that save money on annual electricity costs will increase the property’s value by a 20-to-1 ratio. In other words, if you are saving $1,000 a year off your electricity bill by using solar power, the increase in your property’s value could be $20,000

A solar power system on your home demonstrates your commitment to clean, renewable energy.

Solar technology is proven, reliable, and has no moving parts. Our panels come with a 25 year warranty.

Solar energy creates more jobs than competing energy technologies, according to several recent studies by Federal research laboratories and by leading universities. Most jobs are local, tied to engineering, installation, electrical work, and maintenance. These studies indicate that every megawatt of solar installed creates 24 to 33 new jobs.

Solar produces maximum electricity during peak grid hours, lessoning the strain on the electric grid

How much can I save?

The potential savings from a Solar System depend upon several variables, including your current utility rate, rate structure, amount of sunshine, and the incentives available in your state. One of our Solar representative can provide an assessment of the potential savings for your home.

Environmental Impact of Solar*

A transition to solar power benefits homeowners as well as the environment we share. Energy Usage Facts National figures show an annual average electricity use of 11,000 kWh (kilowatt-hours) per household, a bit over 900 kWh monthly.

The approximate average cost of energy is $300.00 each month The average American home emits over 16,000 pounds of CO2 annually. It takes 24 trees to offset that The figures are even more compelling when you compare them with auto use.

The average person drives 12,000 miles each year with an approximate rating of 20 MPG. This “average car” will use 600 gallons of gas in a year.

The EPA estimates 19.4 lbs. of CO2 is produced per gallon used.

19.4 lbs. CO2 / gallon x 600 gallons of Fuel = 11,640 pounds CO2 emitted.

If you transition to solar for all your electricity use, you are taking the equivalent of 1.37 cars off the road.Think what an impact just your neighborhood, much less your city, could have on carbon emissions by installing solar power systems

Consider this. What would happen if a mere 5% of American households offset their energy use with solar power? In 2007, the U.S.

Census Bureau estimated the number of households in America at 111,162,259. Rounding up we get 112 million, so 5% is 5.6 million households. That would be an impressive win for our environment, if it came to fruition.

Solar Increases Property Value

Solar Improvement vs. Home Improvements – Long-term studies published in the Appraisal Journal indicate that home improvements that save money on annual electricity costs will increase the property’s value by a 20-to-1 ratio. In other words, if you are saving $1,000 a year off your electricity bill by using solar power, the increase in your property value is $20,000. Home buyers choosing between a home that generates free, self-supporting solar power and a typical home that generates thousands of dollars per year in electricity bills will usually make the rational decision, all other things being equal

In just about every state, increases in assessed property value attributable to solar power systems are fully exempted from property taxes. When you factor in the rebates and incentives, and run the figures over the lifespan of the solar installation, solar power begins to enter the “can’t lose” category.

On the other hand, cosmetic upgrades to bathrooms, kitchens and even outdoor landscaping add to your property’s assessed, taxable value, making it less likely that you will recoup these costs when you sell